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Dominic Raab today turned the tables on a ‘gotcha’ question from a BBC presenter by asking him how much a litre of unleaded petrol costs, saying: ‘I’m just checking how in touch you are’. 

The moment came after BBC Breakfast presenter Charlie Stayt asked the deputy prime minister how much a litre of diesel costs.

Mr Raab said that he buys unleaded, and the last time he visited a petrol station it was 165 – 167p per litre.

However, Mr Stayt said that it had ‘gone up’ recently, adding: ‘What’s happening in the real world is that people try and deal with things and those pump prices, as you pass them, they go up by the day.’

Mr Raab then asked Mr Stayt: ‘Well you tell me, what’s a litre of unleaded today?

The moment came after BBC Breakfast presenter Charlie Stayt asked the deputy prime minister how much a litre of diesel costs

The moment came after BBC Breakfast presenter Charlie Stayt asked the deputy prime minister how much a litre of diesel costs

The BBC presenter said that the highest price he had seen for diesel recently was 1.99 per litre at a service station on the M6.

Mr Raab pressed again on the price of unleaded: ‘I’m just checking how in touch you are, because last time I looked it was 165 – 167p.’

Mr Stayt said that 168p was the latest price that he had seen for unleaded.

The deputy prime minister replied: ‘I’m just making the point that I’m actually right about the cost of a litre of unleaded.’

Statistics from data firm Experian Catalist indicates the average cost of a litre of petrol at UK forecourts on Wednesday was 168.2p, up from 167.6p per litre on Tuesday.

Diesel prices reached an average of 181p per litre on Wednesday, up from 180.9p a day earlier.

After Mr Stayt's comment about 'the real world', Mr Raab then asked him: 'Well you tell me, what's a litre of unleaded today?

After Mr Stayt’s comment about ‘the real world’, Mr Raab then asked him: ‘Well you tell me, what’s a litre of unleaded today?

Retailers could be fined for raising prices after the Competition and Markets Authority threatened to launch a formal investigation into the sector.

‘If sufficient evidence emerges that the fuel tax cut has not been passed on to consumers, this would be an indication that competition is not working well in this market,’ said CEO Andrea Coscelli.

‘In that case we would consider launching a formal investigation, which could ultimately lead to fines or legally binding commitments from companies to change their behaviour.’

The government cut fuel duty for petrol and diesel by 5 pence per litre across the country for 12 months in March, savings which were supposed to be passed down to customers, but prices have increased anyway.

Motoring group the AA said petrol costs were about to hit their highest ever levels on Sunday when petrol was 180.29p, but prices soared past those levels earlier this week. 

The Consumer-Price Index measures by how much good and services bought every day in Britain have risen, used as an indicator of inflation

The Consumer-Price Index measures by how much good and services bought every day in Britain have risen, used as an indicator of inflation

The news comes after money-saving expert Martin Lewis predicted a rise in the energy price cap this winter from £1,971 to £2,600, with the pay increase scheduled for October.

He told Robert Peston’s ITV he was worried about civil unrest should the cost-of-living crisis endure for much longer.

The new chief inspector of constabulary Andy Cooke said yesterday that the impact of poverty will lead to an increase in offending, telling officers to use their own discretion when deciding to arrest people for stealing food to eat.

Policing minister Kit Malthouse, however, said officers should enforce the law in all instances.

Discount chains such as Aldi and Iceland have upped the cost of an average item in their shops by more than the bigger chains like Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda and Morrisons in the last 12 months.

Sharp increases in energy and other household bills have been driving the recent spike in inflation

Sharp increases in energy and other household bills have been driving the recent spike in inflation 

An average item now costs 31p more than it did 12 months ago in Iceland – a rise of 11 per cent – while Aldi prices have risen by 19p on average – a rise of 9.6 per cent.

The ‘Big Four’ supermarkets, Asda, Tesco, Sainsbury’s and Morrisons, have kept average price rises down to around 3 per cent.

Inflation hit 9 per cent on Wednesday, the highest level since 1982. Unemployment in 1982 had risen above three million for the first time since 1930s, meaning one in eight people were out of work.   

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