King Charles believes that Britain¿s role in the transatlantic slave trade should not be hidden, his goddaughter said yesterday (pictured in Leeds on November 8)

King Charles believes that Britain’s role in the transatlantic slave trade should not be hidden, his goddaughter said yesterday.

Fiona Compton, 41, whose father was Sir John Compton, former prime minister of St Lucia, revealed that she and the King have been speaking about the need for ‘openness’ when discussing Britain’s historical role in the horrific global trade.

She said: ‘He is ready to have active conversations about Britain’s relationship with the slave trade. He agrees this is British history, and it should not be hidden.’

Miss Compton showed Charles her slave-themed artwork in Leeds as he visited World Reimagined, a project involving trails of large globe sculptures in cities across the UK created by artists to bring to life the impact of the transatlantic slave trade.

King Charles believes that Britain¿s role in the transatlantic slave trade should not be hidden, his goddaughter said yesterday (pictured in Leeds on November 8)

King Charles believes that Britain¿s role in the transatlantic slave trade should not be hidden, his goddaughter said yesterday (pictured in Leeds on November 8)

King Charles believes that Britain’s role in the transatlantic slave trade should not be hidden, his goddaughter said yesterday (pictured in Leeds on November 8)

Speaking afterwards, she added: ‘It’s early days and positive conversations and willingness for openness and engagement.

‘The project and conversations is about engaging British history in the slave trade and having open and meaningful conversations about it.

‘It’s ongoing conversations, he says he is ready to speak on it he is ready to have conversations on and see what work can be done.

‘[We’ve been] Having the conversations for a while. There’s no talk of reparations.

‘It’s not solely for the British monarchy, it’s for British people to have these conversations.’

At the end of the campaign, the sculptures will be auctioned to raise funds to support projects to promote racial justice.

Miss Compton, an historian, artist and official ambassador for London’s Notting Hill Carnival, was born in St Lucia, where her father became the first Prime Minister after independence from Britain in 1979. She showed the King her ‘Palace of the Peacock’ artwork.

Charles arrived to huge cheers outside Leeds Central Library and Art Gallery and met Mason Hicks, 10, the Leeds Children’s Mayor, who presented the King with a birthday card ahead of his 74th birthday next week.

Fiona Compton, 41, whose father was Sir John Compton, former prime minister of St Lucia, revealed that she and the King have been speaking about the need for ¿openness¿ when discussing Britain¿s historical role in the horrific global trade

Fiona Compton, 41, whose father was Sir John Compton, former prime minister of St Lucia, revealed that she and the King have been speaking about the need for ¿openness¿ when discussing Britain¿s historical role in the horrific global trade

Fiona Compton, 41, whose father was Sir John Compton, former prime minister of St Lucia, revealed that she and the King have been speaking about the need for ‘openness’ when discussing Britain’s historical role in the horrific global trade

The King, who is on a two-day tour of Yorkshire, earlier enthusiastically shared his tips for the perfect Sunday roast when he visited the Bradford headquarters of the supermarket chain Morrisons.

Charles was in the company’s development kitchen, where they work on ideas for new dishes.

The secret to the perfect roast potato, he said, was to cook them in the fat from the joint.

And when presented with a roast rib of beef, the King responded: ‘This smells irresistible.’

He discussed the finer points of how to cook a joint – fast, then slow – with chef Mark Richmond and added that using the fat that comes off the meat is essential for a good roast potato.

After Mr Richmond described the other dishes the kitchen had been working on, including triple smoked salmon with herb creme fraiche and vegetables pickled in whisky, Charles laughed: ‘Do you have any appetite left at all?’

The King, who is on a two-day tour of Yorkshire, earlier enthusiastically shared his tips for the perfect Sunday roast when he visited the Bradford headquarters of the supermarket chain Morrisons

The King, who is on a two-day tour of Yorkshire, earlier enthusiastically shared his tips for the perfect Sunday roast when he visited the Bradford headquarters of the supermarket chain Morrisons

The King, who is on a two-day tour of Yorkshire, earlier enthusiastically shared his tips for the perfect Sunday roast when he visited the Bradford headquarters of the supermarket chain Morrisons

At a mock up of the fresh food counters in Morrisons stores, the King expressed a fondness for plate steak, a cheap cut from the brisket.

Charles then visited the fishmonger, where he told Gemma Sunderland, 40, the market street manager in Huddersfield, that one of his favourites was hake.

The commercial manager of Chippindale Foods, Claire Anderson, responsible for the carbon zero eggs sold in Morrisons, then showed the King the black soldier fly larvae that are fed on waste products from their factories.

Miss Anderson brought the larvae, which are fed to their chickens to reduce the amount of soy in their diet, in their dried form to show Charles.

At a mock up of the fresh food counters in Morrisons stores, the King expressed a fondness for plate steak, a cheap cut from the brisket

At a mock up of the fresh food counters in Morrisons stores, the King expressed a fondness for plate steak, a cheap cut from the brisket

At a mock up of the fresh food counters in Morrisons stores, the King expressed a fondness for plate steak, a cheap cut from the brisket

‘We did not think that wriggling around ones would be suitable for today!’ Miss Anderson said.

He also wanted to know if they produced a good yolk colour.

‘The yolk colour and yolk consistency is very important [to him],’ she said. ‘He also asked about bird flu – the poor chickens being locked inside. They are normally free range, and have been locked inside since yesterday to protect them against avian influenza.’

In an impromptu speech at the end of his visit, the King looked up at the crowds of staff at every balcony in the atrium of the headquarters and told them: ‘It has been so enormously heartening to see the kinds of thing you do within your communities. It is very special.

‘I can only thank you for all of that, and wish you every possible success in the future – and eventually, a very happy Christmas, I hope.’

You May Also Like

Lawmakers ask Biden to add drug czar to Cabinet

A group of congressional lawmakers on Thursday called on President Biden to…

Health Care — The days of free COVID tests are numbered

🎤 Beyoncé has officially announced the dates for her Renaissance Tour this…

Dyson among British entrepreneurs who own UK property via overseas companies | Business

Billionaires and business figures including James Dyson and Tina Green own UK…

George Pell funeral: St Mary’s Cathedral, Sydney surrounded by protesters, Catholic supporters

There have been tense scenes outside the funeral of Cardinal George Pell…

Missing mother Nicola Bulley was ‘excitedly making plans for the future’

Missing mother-of-two Nicola Bulley was ‘excitedly making plans for the future’ the…

White House outlines new investments to help families with kids fighting cancer

The White House on Thursday marked one year since President Biden relaunched…

Major change coming to Australia’s $5 note – and the Royal Family will no longer be featured

Extraordinary change announced for Australia’s $5 note with the Royal Family DISAPPEARING…

Half a million listeners tune out of BBC Radio 2 and turn to commercial rivals

BBC Radio 2 has lost 580,000 listeners in a year where they…